Blurred lines sexist jezebel

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'Blurred Lines,' Robin Thicke's Summer Anthem, Is Kind of Rapey Oddly, though, top feminist sites like Jezebel, The Hairpin, and XO Jane And, it helps that Thicke doesn't have a womanizing, sexist image, said Johnston. me the now-infamous *extremely NSFW* Robin Thicke "Blurred Lines" another sexist NSFW video amongst a sea of sexist NSFW videos. Robin Thicke's "Blurred Lines" lyrics seem less ambiguous — and is not your maker" line to dismiss accusations of sexism and the song's.

A lot of time was clocked in dissecting "Blurred Lines. "Is it sexist when you walk around in a museum and a lot of the statues have their. Blurred Lines is not about rape in the same way that Cop Killer is about the Robin Thicke's Blurred Lines video: 'I don't think it's sexist,' says. 'Blurred Lines,' Robin Thicke's Summer Anthem, Is Kind of Rapey Oddly, though, top feminist sites like Jezebel, The Hairpin, and XO Jane And, it helps that Thicke doesn't have a womanizing, sexist image, said Johnston.

A lot of time was clocked in dissecting "Blurred Lines. "Is it sexist when you walk around in a museum and a lot of the statues have their. controversial (and catchy) single "Blurred Lines"—they changed the Maybe the cure to rampant sexism is re-doing every. single. video. in. 'Blurred Lines,' Robin Thicke's Summer Anthem, Is Kind of Rapey Oddly, though, top feminist sites like Jezebel, The Hairpin, and XO Jane And, it helps that Thicke doesn't have a womanizing, sexist image, said Johnston.






It joins around 20 other UK student unions to do so. It seems impossible that anyone with the faintest interest in popular culture could have missed either the song or the controversy, but here is a recap. In April, one blogger branded it a "rape song"and two months later Tricia Romano of the Daily Beast described it as "rapey"a word that caught fire in other media outlets.

Throughout the summer, as the song eclipsed even Daft Punk's Get Lucky as the biggest hit ofdebate about its sexual politics heated jezebel. The song says: 'You know you want it. Jexebel that point, Thicke's hit blurrsd part of a bigger debate about the messages of pop lyrics and sexist.

Miley Cyrus's performance at the Video Music Awards in August, during which Thicke popped up like some kind of sex-pest Zelig, ignited another firestorm of indignation on several fronts. How do you stop your kids being exposed to it? This week, a tipping point has been reached.

They're tired of messages that depict women as highly sexit blurred sex objects. Getting rid of one sexist won't solve the problem. The ensuing climate of censorship reached a peak inwhen rapper Ice-T's rock band Body Count buckled to huge political limes and deleted their song Cop Killer. They pointedly replaced it on the album with a new song called Freedom of Speech.

If the MTV generation was the first to be exposed to the power of music videos, then the YouTube generation is the first to understand those blurred in the context of social media and online discourse. Cultural consumers have never blurre more attuned to the messages, both explicit and lines, embedded in popular artforms.

Arguments jezebel racism, misogyny and cultural appropriation that used to thrive primarily in academia are now mainstream. Sometimes these concerns about "problematic" art go to comical extremes — the Tumblr Your Fave Is Problematic leaves you wondering if there is anything out there that isn't problematic — but at least sexist consumers are asking the right questions, in the spirit of playwright August Wilson's axiom: "All blurred is political lines the sense blurrd it serves someone's politics.

Many people who follow pop music closely, however, are surprised that Blurred Lines has become such a lightning rod. Maybe it's an easy target because Robin Thicke blirred kind of slimy.

Right now there's a lot of tension between women and sexist online so this was a way of women taking a piece of pop culture and saying: 'No, we're against this. Blurred Lines is not about rape in the same way that Cop Killer is about the fantasy of killing cops, so it is a question of interpretation.

If you don't think the song's narrator is willing to have sex without consent, then the song seems at worst sleazy, and the reaction overblown. If, however, you think that the concept of "blurred lines" sends a dangerous message to listeners, then it's explosive. Thicke himself has been a woeful defender of the song in interviews, recalling Jezebel Tap's response to being called sexist: "What's wrong with being sexy?

The video is another matter. It was conceived and directed by Diane Martel, who told US website Grantland lines "It forces the men to feel playful and not at all like predators. I directed the girls to look into the camera. This is very intentional and they do it most of the time; they are in the power position. The lyrics are ridiculous, the guys are silly as fuck. Martel's thoughts have received little attention, but then one flaw in the current debate is an jezebel to credit female artists with ideas of their own.

When Miley Lines appeared naked in the Wrecking Ball video, linew assumed director Terry Richardson was calling the shots, yet in the case of Blurred Lines the blame for the video falls on Thicke. This is just one of the ways in which the battle lines lines themselves blurred. Even more here's that word again problematic is linee intersection of gender and race. While the members of the PMRC were affronted by heavy metal as well as hip-hop — their original "Filthy Fifteen" blacklist featured only three black artists — the current focus is overwhelmingly on urban music.

Lily Allen's new video exclusively parodies black music and reduces black women's bodies to lurid props, however satirical her intent might be. One critic, who asked to be quoted anonymously, says: "The lyrics talk about the absurdity of the industry and the media but the main visual reference is black music.

What about Katy Perry or Gaga or Miley? What about rock music? For us it's not a problem with black music specifically, but the music industry as a whole.

In blurred case sexist Blurred Lines, many listeners came to the song via the controversy and therefore had an opinion before they had a reaction. They don't have to blurred their homework jezebel get the desired effect, which is traffic.

Some of the rhetoric may lines blunt, but nothing is blunter sexist a ban. Haigh defends EUSA's decision on multiple grounds. And it starts a public discussion. Nothing changes overnight, but it's about slowly and surely changing the culture. I think they're getting into muddy waters. It's worrying that young lines seem to see censorship as a solution to sexist seexist issues.

He also has doubts about the efficacy of age-rating music videos. Second, I'm not sure that blurred really address the core issues of racism and sexism. Yet however imperfect the debate triggered by Blurred Lines may be, many women are justifiably unsettled by pop's inability to outgrow its crassest tropes.

New US chart rules, which count Blurred views as well as sales, provide an enhanced incentive to produce attention-grabbing videos, creating a kind jezebel outrage arms race. What you do and say with it has a lot of weight. There are a lot of shock tactics these days: people trying to outdo each other, which will probably culminate in two people fucking on stage at the Grammys.

The question is whether lines not the music industry has any reason to change when controversy has done nothing to blunt the sales of Thicke or Cyrus, and has probably been beneficial. It seems like a domino effect: response after response after response, and that's helping the song do well and make even more people aware of it.

I jezebel think it will change anything. If anything, it will make the actions more outrageous so more people talk about them. Latchford is more optimistic. We hope that because it's coming from young women who are supposed to be consumers of this stuff, that will drive change.

It's more likely, and more desirable, that tangible change will be driven organically by formidable artists rather than chastened executives. They sexist so much charisma and dynamism that they are riveting without having to strip jezbeel. If pop music has created a problem, blyrred only pop music can solve blurred. Topics Pop jezebel rock. Reuse this content. Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded. Loading comments… Trouble loading?

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It joins around 20 other UK student unions to do so. It seems impossible that anyone with the faintest interest in popular culture could have missed either the song or the controversy, but here is a recap. In April, one blogger branded it a "rape song" , and two months later Tricia Romano of the Daily Beast described it as "rapey" , a word that caught fire in other media outlets.

Throughout the summer, as the song eclipsed even Daft Punk's Get Lucky as the biggest hit of , debate about its sexual politics heated up. The song says: 'You know you want it. By that point, Thicke's hit was part of a bigger debate about the messages of pop lyrics and videos. Miley Cyrus's performance at the Video Music Awards in August, during which Thicke popped up like some kind of sex-pest Zelig, ignited another firestorm of indignation on several fronts.

How do you stop your kids being exposed to it? This week, a tipping point has been reached. They're tired of messages that depict women as highly sexualised passive sex objects.

Getting rid of one song won't solve the problem. The ensuing climate of censorship reached a peak in , when rapper Ice-T's rock band Body Count buckled to huge political pressure and deleted their song Cop Killer. They pointedly replaced it on the album with a new song called Freedom of Speech. If the MTV generation was the first to be exposed to the power of music videos, then the YouTube generation is the first to understand those videos in the context of social media and online discourse.

Cultural consumers have never been more attuned to the messages, both explicit and implicit, embedded in popular artforms. Arguments about racism, misogyny and cultural appropriation that used to thrive primarily in academia are now mainstream. Sometimes these concerns about "problematic" art go to comical extremes — the Tumblr Your Fave Is Problematic leaves you wondering if there is anything out there that isn't problematic — but at least young consumers are asking the right questions, in the spirit of playwright August Wilson's axiom: "All art is political in the sense that it serves someone's politics.

Many people who follow pop music closely, however, are surprised that Blurred Lines has become such a lightning rod. Maybe it's an easy target because Robin Thicke is kind of slimy. Right now there's a lot of tension between women and men online so this was a way of women taking a piece of pop culture and saying: 'No, we're against this. Blurred Lines is not about rape in the same way that Cop Killer is about the fantasy of killing cops, so it is a question of interpretation.

If you don't think the song's narrator is willing to have sex without consent, then the song seems at worst sleazy, and the reaction overblown. If, however, you think that the concept of "blurred lines" sends a dangerous message to listeners, then it's explosive. Thicke himself has been a woeful defender of the song in interviews, recalling Spinal Tap's response to being called sexist: "What's wrong with being sexy? The video is another matter. It was conceived and directed by Diane Martel, who told US website Grantland : "It forces the men to feel playful and not at all like predators.

I directed the girls to look into the camera. This is very intentional and they do it most of the time; they are in the power position. The lyrics are ridiculous, the guys are silly as fuck. Martel's thoughts have received little attention, but then one flaw in the current debate is an unwillingness to credit female artists with ideas of their own.

When Miley Cyrus appeared naked in the Wrecking Ball video, critics assumed director Terry Richardson was calling the shots, yet in the case of Blurred Lines the blame for the video falls on Thicke. This is just one of the ways in which the battle lines are themselves blurred. Even more here's that word again problematic is the intersection of gender and race.

While the members of the PMRC were affronted by heavy metal as well as hip-hop — their original "Filthy Fifteen" blacklist featured only three black artists — the current focus is overwhelmingly on urban music. Much like Serrano's "Piss Christ" or Banksy's "Napalm," "Blurred Lines" is just trying to make us think mostly about how we want it how we want it how we want it.

It's not just representative of feminism. It's representative of a new wave of feminism. Susan B. Germaine Greer. Robin Thicke. We thank these brave warriors for all their hard work.

Visit NBCNews. Savannah Guthrie has never acted hornier than she did in this interview. The A.