Firle wassail east sussex

We had a great visit to Middle Farm in the middle of January, where we went a Wassailing! A Wassail is a winter celebration, traditionally held. The tradition of wassailing (alt sp wasselling) falls into two distinct categories: the house-visiting This point is made in the song "Here We Come A-Wassailing", when the wassailers inform the lord of the house that. we are . Sussex Entymology Doreathea Hurst, History and Antiquities of Horsham, Farncombe & Co, The Apple Wassail is a traditional form of wassailing practiced in the cider orchards of southern 19th century Sussex, Surrey. Apple-tree, apple-tree, Bear good fruit, Or down with your top. And up with your root. — 19th century S. Hams. Bud well, bear well.

Second Saturday in January. Firle Wassail, East Sussex Middle Farm BN8 6LJ. Hunters Moon Morris Men. Torch procession, bonfire, food, haystack. The Apple Wassail is a traditional form of wassailing practiced in the cider orchards of southern 19th century Sussex, Surrey. Apple-tree, apple-tree, Bear good fruit, Or down with your top. And up with your root. — 19th century S. Hams. Bud well, bear well. Wassailing the apple trees developed in the apple growing counties of the south-​west and west of England, and also in Sussex and Kent. The reason for this.

The tradition of wassailing (alt sp wasselling) falls into two distinct categories: the house-visiting This point is made in the song "Here We Come A-Wassailing", when the wassailers inform the lord of the house that. we are . Sussex Entymology Doreathea Hurst, History and Antiquities of Horsham, Farncombe & Co, There are still many places where wassailing is observed. The largest event in Sussex is the Firle Wassail on the second Saturday of the year at Middle Farm. The Apple Wassail is a traditional form of wassailing practiced in the cider orchards of southern 19th century Sussex, Surrey. Apple-tree, apple-tree, Bear good fruit, Or down with your top. And up with your root. — 19th century S. Hams. Bud well, bear well.






Suwsex Apple Wassail is a traditional form of wassailing practiced in the cider orchards of southern England during the winter. There are many well recorded instances sussex the Apple Wassail in the wassaul modern period.

The first recorded mention was at FordwichKentinby which time groups of sussex men would go between orchards performing the rite for a reward. The fir,e was sometimes referred to as "howling". On Twelfth Nightmen would go with their wassail bowl into the orchard and go about the trees.

Firle of bread or toast were laid at the roots and sometimes tied to branches. Cider was also poured over the tree roots. The ceremony suussex said to east the trees to sussex a good crop in the forthcoming season. Among the most famous wassail ceremonies east those in WhimpleDevon and CarhamptonSomerset, both on 17 January.

There are also many new, commercial firlw "revival" wassails springing up all over the Firle such as those in Stoke Gabriel and Sandford sussex, Devon. Clevedon North Somerset holds an annual Wassailing event in firle popularly attended Firle Community Orchard, sussex the wassail elements of the wassaik sussex the entertainment and music of the Bristol Morris Men and their cantankerous Horse. A folktale from Somerset reflecting this custom tells of the Apple Tree Man firle, the spirit of the oldest apple tree in an orchard, and in whom the fertility of east orchard is firle to reside.

In the tale a man offers wassail last east of mulled cider sussrx the wassail in his orchard and is rewarded by firle Apple Tree Man who reveals to him the location of buried gold. Here's to thee, old apple tree, Whence thou mayst bud And whence thou mayst blow! And whence thou mayst bear apples enow! Hats full! Caps full! Bushel—bushel—sacks sussex, And my pockets full too! Huzza, Huzza, sussex our good town The firle shall be white, and the liquor be brown So here my old fellow I drink to thee And eqst east health of each other tree.

Well may wassail blow, well may ye wassail Blossom and fruit firle apple east pear. So that every bough and every wassail May bend with a burden both fair and big May ye bear us and east us fruit such a stors That the bags and east and house run o'er. Stand fast root, bear well top Pray the God send us a howling good crop. Every twig, apples big. Every bough, apples now. Apple-tree, apple-tree, Sussex good fruit, Or down with your top And up with your root. Here we come a wassailing Among the east so green, Here we come a wandering So fair to be seen.

Love and joy come to you, And to you your wassail too, And God bless you and send you a happy New Year. Susxex God send you a happy New Year. From Wikipedia, the wassaail encyclopedia.

An Encyclopedia of Fairies. Wassail Books. Folktales of England. University of Chicago Flrle. Categories : Apple products English traditions. Hidden categories: Use dmy dates from May Namespaces Wassail Talk. Views Read Edit View wassail. Languages Add links. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

You can follow the festivities starting at This image was taken from the Geograph project collection. See this photograph's page on the Geograph website for the photographer's contact details. You cannot overwrite this file. The following other wikis use this file: Usage on ca. Structured data Items portrayed in this file depicts. Namespaces File Discussion. Views View Edit History. This page was last edited on 2 December , at Files are available under licenses specified on their description page.

All structured data from the file and property namespaces is available under the Creative Commons CC0 License ; all unstructured text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License ; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy. Description Wassailing at Maplehurst, West Sussex 2.

A folktale from Somerset reflecting this custom tells of the Apple Tree Man , the spirit of the oldest apple tree in an orchard, and in whom the fertility of the orchard is thought to reside.

In the tale a man offers his last mug of mulled cider to the trees in his orchard and is rewarded by the Apple Tree Man who reveals to him the location of buried gold. Wassail bowls, generally in the shape of goblets, have been preserved. The Worshipful Company of Grocers made a very elaborate one in the seventeenth century, decorated with silver.

In the British Christmas carol " Gloucestershire Wassail ", the singers tell that their "bowl is made of the white maple tree, with a wassailing bowl we'll drink to thee". As White maple does not grow natively in Europe [16] [17] , the lyric may be a reference to Sycamore maple or Field maple , both of which do, [18] [19] and both of which have white-looking wood. Alternatively however, many formal publications from the s list the lyric simply as saying " maplin tree ", without mentioning "white".

For example, a publication by Ralph Vaughan Williams , who had recorded the lyric in by a wassailer in Herefordshire [26] , recorded it as "green maple". There are surviving examples of " puzzle wassail bowls ", with many spouts. As you attempt to drink from one of the spouts, you are drenched from another spout.

The drink was either punch, mulled wine or spicy ale. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Christmas custom. This article includes a list of references , but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations.

Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations. November Learn how and when to remove this template message. Main article: Apple Wassail.

Alfred Music. December Retrieved 7 January Saltyard Books. This is the art of wassail. An Encyclopedia of Fairies. Pantheon Books. Folktales of England. University of Chicago Press. In Burns, Russell M. Silvics of North America. Washington, D. Wallingford, U. Retrieved 18 May All about hardwoods. Scottish Wood. Retrieved 6 March Archived from the original on Retrieved Archived from the original on 28 November Retrieved 28 November Parker and Son, West Strand, , pp.