Hamford water essex

The natural wonders of Walton

Walton Backwaters and Hamford Water is an area of tidal creeks, mudflats, islands, salt marshes and marsh grasslands. The public footpath. Hamford Water is a 2,hectare (5,acre) biological Site of Special Scientific Interest between Walton-on-the-Naze and Harwich in Essex. The site is a. Hamford Water National Nature Reserve. Hamford Water is a large, shallow inlet between Walton-on-the-Naze and Dovercourt with an interesting complex of.

Horsey Island is an island in the parish of Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex. It lies in Hamford Water and is part of the Hamford Water National Nature Reserve. The Walton Backwaters: Going with the flow in Essex salt marsh and glittering creeks are preserved as the Hamford Water National Nature. The centre is known as the gateway to Hamford Water, the most easterly peninsula in Essex. The trails lead north from the car park to the lake and John Weston.

Hamford Water is home to wintering populations of dark-bellied Brent geese, black-tailed godwit, redshank, ringed and grey plover, shelduck, teal and avocet. The Walton Backwaters: Going with the flow in Essex salt marsh and glittering creeks are preserved as the Hamford Water National Nature. Horsey Island is an island in the parish of Thorpe-le-Soken, Essex. It lies in Hamford Water and is part of the Hamford Water National Nature Reserve.






Horsey Hamford is an island in the parish of Thorpe-le-SokenEssex. The water section of the island contains hamford freshwater pool surrounded hmford trees. At one point boats hamford moor here, but this is now discouraged.

There are a number of oyster beds along here and the north edge essex the island. In the centre of the island are a number of farm hamford. In the 19th century, a large section of land was reclaimed, with a essex of sea walls essex. Along with extensive saltings surrounding the island, this offered partial protection against flooding. The island is linked to the mainland by a 0. The earliest known record of Horsey Island dates fromessex it was known as "Horse Hey".

Water local geography has meant Horsey Island has been regularly susceptible to flooding, including severe floods in, and the North Sea flood of The Wade was repaired essex the flood. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Tidal island in Essex, England. Not to be confused with Horsea Island. Office for National Statistics.

Retrieved 25 March watdr The Water Telegraph. Retrieved 10 October Holiday Lettings. Michael O'Mara Books. Fautley, M. Essex Coastline: Then water Now. Matthew Fautley. Hidden categories: Water with short description Hamford on Wikidata. Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history.

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He pointed out how the common seals' fur has been dyed a rich foxy red by iron oxide in the mud, and explained how their pups can swim almost from birth. On our way back past Bramble Island we crossed the Wade, a stretch of open water between Horsey and the mainland. Haggis prodded a boathook over the side to show how shallow it was — less than four feet under our bows. At low water the Wade dries out completely, allowing Horsey's owners a brief window in which to drive across before the tide returns.

Back on shore again I made for the Naze Tower, an octagonal brick lighthouse put up in by Trinity House to warn sailors away from the treacherous offshore shoals. The crumbling cliffs on which it stands are stuffed with sharks' teeth and other fossils laid down 55 million years ago, but are being gobbled up by the sea at the rate of seven feet a year. When the tower was built it stood a quarter of a mile inland. In the Seventies it stood derelict until Roy Bradley, a musician with the Nitwits band, bought it as a present for his wife.

He planned to hoist a grand piano to the roof, but when that proved to be impossible the tower changed hands again and opened to the public for the first time in The view from the top is worth the climb — a gull's eye panorama that puts the entire mosaic of the Walton marshes into perspective more effectively than any map.

To round off the day I drove up to Harwich for a quick tour around what David Whittle, vice-chairman of the Harwich Society, calls "one of the best-kept secrets in Essex". He's right, too. I had imagined Harwich to be a vast seaport heaving with container ships and continental ferries.

Instead, hidden behind the waterfront, I found a quiet little town oozing with salty maritime history. Its three main streets run north to south, following the grid plan set down in medieval times, and across them run narrow, dogleg alleys designed to keep out the notorious East Anglian wind.

Here lived Christopher Jones, master of the Mayflower. His house still stands in King's Quay Street. What a sight it must have been a century ago when Harwich Quay was lined with bawleys — east coast sailing craft designed for catching shrimps and whitebait.

Or earlier still when the old Naval dockyard was building men o' war, including the gun Conqueror that fought at Trafalgar. One of the most distinctive buildings is the blue-and-white-painted Pier Hotel, overlooking the Ha'penny Pier a wooden Victorian structure named after the price of admission when it was built in Owned by Paul Milsom of Le Talbooth fame, this is without doubt the place to really push the boat out.

Splash out if you can on the Mayflower Suite with its brass telescope and wide picture windows overlooking the waters where the Orwell flowing down from Ipswich meets the Stour on its way from Constable's England. From here you can watch the continental ferries sliding past like ocean-going tower blocks on their way upriver to Parkeston Quay, with Suffolk lying on the opposite shore like another country.

Then head for the Harbourside, the Pier Hotel's upstairs restaurant with its polished pewter bar, and treat yourself to champagne and oysters local, of course , followed by lobster or sea bass expertly prepared by the head chef, Chris Oakley, who has been here since it opened in Essex doesn't get much better than this. Booking essential or Along with extensive saltings surrounding the island, this offered partial protection against flooding. The island is linked to the mainland by a 0.

The earliest known record of Horsey Island dates from , when it was known as "Horse Hey". The local geography has meant Horsey Island has been regularly susceptible to flooding, including severe floods in , , and the North Sea flood of The Wade was repaired after the flood. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Tidal island in Essex, England. Not to be confused with Horsea Island. Office for National Statistics. Is there much else to do in Walton-on-the-Naze itself? Their web-site doesn't really list specifics.

Hamford Water is home to wintering populations of dark-bellied Brent geese, black-tailed godwit, redshank, ringed and grey plover, shelduck, teal and avocet. There is also a large breeding colony of little terns. During severe winter weather the area is an important refuge for wildfowl and waders. The reserve's saltmarshes support one of Britain's rarest coastal plants: sea hog's fennel. To the north the area is bounded by the B accessed via the A and in the south by the B accessed via the A It is probably best to contact the National Nature Reserves beforehand as the area is sometimes closed to the public if there are ground nesting birds on site.

Visitors can access the island but must have prior permission to do so. For details telephone the Trust on The nearest car parking, toilet and refreshment facilities are in Walton-on-the-Naze. It is a nice walk between Frinton and Walton-on-Naze along the cliff tops or on the lower promenade next to the sea.

If you want a nice beach and somewhere to have a picnic then I'd opt for Frinton. The pier and amusements are in Walton-on-Naze and it can get busy during school holidays. Walton has the second longest pier in the world, with the usual 'amusements' BUT is worth walking out to the very end of the pier to see the local lifeboat, and great views along the Essex Sunshine Coast. Essex Wildlife Trust are the current caretakers. Walking the coast is worth-it, the display of tiers of beach huts is probably unique in the world.

The nearest 'top end' accommodation is probably going to be inland, in or near Colchester. I'm sorry, I also thought I had written a long reply, only to find days later it never got posted. Any hotel after TripAdvisor's 1 in Essex which was booked out , seem to be a large step down to 2 and lower. Instead we went to Rye and Hastings for the day.