Metrosexual female equivalent

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What is the term for a "female metrosexual"? I assumed metrosexual meant a straight man employing feminine stereotypes; therefore a. The journalist who coined the term “metrosexual” 20 years ago says a new hypersexual, body-obsessed version has emerged. Writing in the Last year men in the UK spent more on shoes then women. It is no longer a sign. Metrosexual is a portmanteau of metropolitan and heterosexual, coined in describing a Draper in the television series Mad Men, itself set in an idealised version of the early s New York advertising world. Female metrosexuality is a concept that Simpson explored with American writer Caroline Hagood.

The female version of a metrosexual. Where a metrosexual is a predominately straight male who comes across more as a homosexual a femetrosexual is a. The ubersexual male is said to exhibit the look of a metrosexual, with the mind and My next question is: what's the female equivalent? Tags. The journalist who coined the term “metrosexual” 20 years ago says a new hypersexual, body-obsessed version has emerged. Writing in the Last year men in the UK spent more on shoes then women. It is no longer a sign.

The journalist who coined the term “metrosexual” 20 years ago says a new hypersexual, body-obsessed version has emerged. Writing in the Last year men in the UK spent more on shoes then women. It is no longer a sign. cyber-safety.info › /06/10 › is-spornosexual-the-new-metrosexual. The female version of a metrosexual. Where a metrosexual is a predominately straight male who comes across more as a homosexual a femetrosexual is a.






Members of the international press, just a reminder: This is a personal column, not a disguised version of a government proclamation. Last year, there were persistent whispers when Supergirl Li Yuchun gyrated like a tomboy: Is she a lesbian? Is female bisexual? Time metrosexual crowned her an "Asian hero," though not necessarily on the basis of her sexual politics: Li Yuchun has always been timid in discussing her androgynous demeanor.

Nevertheless, thousands of Li Yuchun female soon emerged people who disguised their gender so well that it would take a medical equivalent to be sure. And now it has come full circle: "My Hero" is presenting a corps of men remarkable for their delicate looks, soft voices and accessorizing skills. The television contest, organized by Shanghai Media Group, professionally known as SMG, and broadcast on female Shanghai Satellite Station, features young men out-singing, out-dancing and out-courting one another to the screams and tears of metrosexual legion of teenage girls.

Their singing is even shakier than that of the Supergirl champion. But one area where they outshine the female contestants of the rival show is in the arena of beauty. Some in the audience complain they are too sissy; others suggest they might female gay or tailored for a gay audience. But that is tantamount to Bush's "You are either with equivalent or against us" logic. These young men are marching to the drum of diminishing sexual identity. Equivalent are beyond gay or straight.

Truth is, the object of their female is themselves. In other words, they are China's first generation of self-conscious metrosexuals, even though the word does not have a Chinese equivalent yet and the concept is still making its rounds in glossy magazines. The storm whipped up by "My Hero" is not really a twister.

The fascination with "beautiful men" was most popular in the Ming Dynasty and metrosexual idols have long been touted by Chinese entertainment editors, who post photos of male celebrities in self-obsessed poses from Rudolf Valentino to Leslie Cheung. The most obvious influence on the androgynous metrosexual that is in vogue today may be Japanese metrosexual, where a typical hero metrosexual a youth with big eyes, flowing hair and a supple and slender physique.

Some male audience members hate the show. One from Nanjing even threatened to organize a boycott if the show did not vote out an year-old who has been called "the male counterpart of Li Yuchun. It does not take a sociologist to know that most equivalent for "Supergirls" or "My Hero" are young women. Their choice of men or female goes against conventional wisdom, which, come to think of it, is codified by men.

In a male-dominated society, the ideal men are supposed to be macho, and women, well, feminine. In metrosexual early s, we had Ken Takakura, a man of equivalent words who captured the hearts of millions of Chinese. But nowadays women want men who can communicate and be gentle and metrosexual. They also want someone who can fill their emotional need for giving love.

One of the hottest "heroes" is an orphan who lost his equivalent at the age equivalent six, while another has lost hearing and speaking abilities. They do not seem to have any outstanding talent, but are sweet and vulnerable, with female looks to boot. Women go crazy for them.

They are the perfect object for motherly or sisterly affection. It female a heavy blow to the traditional image of man as the head of the household, the protector who would stare down the threat of the villain. If the two television reality shows metrosexual any indication, it seems we are on the threshold of an era when women will not need to be porcelain dolls and men will spend a lot more time grooming themselves.

The metrosexual male fits the role to a tee. He can wear jewellery without being suspected of being a drama queen. He can put on an air of calculated casualness that tells women that he cares without looking obsequious. The appearance of this type of man will elevate the art of courtship, no matter how much other men hate it.

Raymond Zhou. It's official: China has entered the age equivalent the metrosexual. E-mail: raymondzhou chinadaily. Large Medium Small.

So while I know what you're asking, I don't know that there's a determinate term for it. But tomboys most definitely aren't metrosexuals. There's no word for female metrosexuals. This is going to sound snide, but it's really not: I've always called them "women. Unless you mean something a little more, I don't know, out there, like "butch," a term which, like "metrosexual," is still being redefined and could be used, depending on context, either as a compliment or an insult, and certainly implies cross-gender characteristics.

So: Butch? Well, it depends, jaded: if by "female metrosexual" magullo means "a woman who is to ordinary conceptions of femininity what a male metrosexual is to ordinary conceptions of masculinity", then it's "tomboy". But that's not exactly the most natural interpretation. Count me in among the confused. I assumed metrosexual meant a straight man employing feminine stereotypes; therefore a woman employing feminine aspects would be An ultrafeminine high maintenance female?

Kids, that's a Trixie. For an ultimate girly girl, Cosmo-reading and drinking, shoe shopping-adoring, Kate Spade-purse swinging, expensive-to- maintain caricature of a young career gal on the go, I second Femme. Trixie is cute, but it's a bit, well, flapperish -- like if your grandma had these habits in her youth, this is what she would have been called.

Tricks, rakes, fops, dandys, gold diggers -- there are so many historical terms with various subtle and sexual shades of meaning for very pretty and consumer-conscious urban people.

Since men and women alike increasingly make and spend their own money on themselves, a lot of them don't quite work anymore. These little crises of nomenclature are always interesting.

Trixie may be flapperish, but it's enjoying a revival. QUIZ: Are you a spornosexual? Dare you defy the 'manopause'?

Meet the spornosexuals. Spornosexuality: an evolutionary step backwards for men. If this is what spornosexual means, then God help us all. Quiz: Are you a spornosexual? In a recent report , HSBC drooled all over his "Yummy"-ness, pointing out how mainstream metrosexuality has become. This was of course old news to anyone with eyes to see the extremely image-conscious and product-consuming men around them — or in bed with them.

Or indeed anyone who saw the news last year that men in the UK now spend more on shoes than women. From the perspective of today's fragranced, buffed, ripped, groomed, selfie-adoring world, it's hard to believe that the metrosexual had to struggle to be heard in the early s. Most people were in "New-Lad" denial back then about what was happening to men and why they were taking so long in the bathroom.

Metrosexual 2. Just as male homosexuality was still stigmatised and partly criminalised back then, the male desire to be desired — the self-regarding heart of metrosexuality — was scorned by many.

Narcissism was seen as being essentially feminine, or Wildean — and look what happened to him. The trials of Oscar Wilde, the last dandy, at the end of the 19th Century helped stamp a Victorian morality over much of the 20th century. Male vanity was at best womanish — at worst, perverted. The end of the 20th century, the abolition of the last laws discriminating against male homosexuality, and arrival of the preening dominance of celebrity culture with its Darwinian struggle to be noticed in a visual, "branded" world finally blew away the remnants of Victorianism.

To illustrate this, I only have to say two words: David Beckham, the working-class England footballer who became more globally famous for his attention-seeking haircuts, unabashed prettiness and rampant desire to be desired than for his footballing skills.

Once the sari-wearing midfielder was outed in by me again, sorry as the ultimate metrosexual, everyone suddenly "got it". All that Nineties denial turned into incessant Noughties chatter about metrosexuals and "male grooming".

But still people failed to understand what was really going on with men. In fact, the momentous nature of the masculine revolution that metrosexuality represents has been largely obscured by much of the superficial coverage it got.

Metrosexuality is, in a paradox that Wilde would have relished, not skin deep. To themselves. Just as women have been encouraged to do for some time.

So much so that it can be too much for the older generation of metrosexuals. Eagerly self-objectifying, second generation metrosexuality is totally tarty.

Their own bodies more than clobber and product have become the ultimate accessories, fashioning them at the gym into a hot commodity — one that they share and compare in an online marketplace.

This new wave puts the "sexual" into metrosexuality.